Stepping Up During The Government Shutdown

January 22, 2019
Shutdown

© Bradley Greeff | Dreamstime.com

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Scrolling through your newsfeed, you're bound to see plenty about the government shutdown. Hundreds of thousands of federal workers have been either furloughed or are working without pay. Washington is home to 11 thousand of them. Most of those affected are not in high paying jobs, so going without a paycheck is getting tougher as the shutdown drags on week after week. But the longer it goes on, the more others are stepping up to help. All over the country, communities are coming together to lend a hand. At Payitfurloughed.com you can buy a beer for a furloughed worker in DC. Restaurants owned by rockers Jon Bon Jovi and KISS are offering free meals to customers who show their federal ID's. There's plenty of love being spread around The Sound, too. A food bank for Coast Guard members has been set up by volunteers at the base in Seattle. There's also a food bank in Ballard that is helping other federal workers, and because our pets have to eat, too, Seattle Humane is letting the federally employed know about their pet food bank. Several local restaurants have stepped up to offer free meals or discounts to furloughed workers.

It's hard, if not impossible, to pay the bills when there's no money coming in. AT&T, T-Mobile and Verizon are encouraging their furloughed customers to call to arrange special payment plans/deferrals. Banks and credit unions are offering interest-free loans and/or waiving late fees. Utility companies are also offering some relief to those who ask. Even the Seattle Symphony is letting furloughed workers into its performances for free.

Probably the most interesting offer comes from Rosetta Stone, the language learning service.  If you're a federal worker who's staying home, why not use that time learning a new language? Drop them a line at expandyourword@rosettastone.com and find out about their free offer.

It's the longest government shut down in U.S. history and no matter how you look at it, it's a bad thing. But if you look around it, there is plenty of good going on, too.